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Getting a fix

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  • Getting a fix

    There I was, sitting in my car making engine noises, with the car's head liner falling down.

    Even though it wasn't pushing on my hat yet, it was pretty clear that this condition had to be addressed. I had not taken care of it and numerous other things when first getting the car on the street simply because I didn't care much about the little stuff, only major items. Anyway, rather than repair it the right and reasonable way (turn the car upside down, rip out the old one, and glue in some indoor/outdoor carpet), I elected to do a quick and easy repair.

    "Hmm," I thought, "a bow could work here." Since the main problem was sorta in the middle of the car, I removed the moldings above the doors. Here I noticed some slots along the sides for the molding clips. I figured that these could be put to good use to facilitate the bow.

    I fashioned the bow from a piece of 1/8" X 1" 6061 aluminum. It looked pretty much like a recurve-type archery bow. First I formed the ends to fit, then stuck an end in one side and--a little at a time--shortened the other end so that I could push it up into the slot. Took some effort but there it was.

    It seemed to do the trick for about 5 minutes, then the bow reversed, and it and the liner sagged. Awesome.

    Being determined, I leapt to a 3/16" X 1-1/2" piece of the same material, did the bow trick on it, and went about the installation.

    This one was a real bear to get installed. Fact is, after beginning the process, I wasn't sure I was enough of a man to do it. Turned out that it went in, but in the process it popped out of place a few times and nearly took my head off. Oh--and I managed to hurt my arm.

    "What about the moldings?" you ask me. The front clips still worked, and at the rear I simply drilled a hole through the moldings and used screw holes in the rails under the head liner that had previously had screws in them that apparently acted as spacers/supports.

    So far, things seem to be working. Oddly enough, the bow kinda reminds me of the piece that went across the top of some cars with Landau tops, so I'm calling it an "Upside-down Landau."
    Paul N.

    '84 EXP: 5.0, T-5, 4.30 9", Fat Tires
    Backyard Experiment

    sumptus censum ne superet
    (let not your spending exceed your income)

  • #2
    Hope it doesn’t pop down when you are driving down the road.
    ----1999 F150 XLT Lariat Super Cab 4X4 5.4----
    -----1947 Lincoln Zephyr Coupe 5.0-----
    -----2005 Expedition Eddie Bauer 5.4----
    " Sometimes you fix the car, sometimes the car fixes you" Steve L.

    "Do not let anyone tell you it cannot be done. No challenge can match the heart and fight and spirit of America". President Donald J. Trump

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ford84stepside View Post
      Hope it doesn’t pop down when you are driving down the road.
      Now that it's in there securely, I think it would be difficult to get it out. Probably have to cut it...
      Paul N.

      '84 EXP: 5.0, T-5, 4.30 9", Fat Tires
      Backyard Experiment

      sumptus censum ne superet
      (let not your spending exceed your income)

      Comment

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