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Fuel pressure gauge non-liquid filled or liquid filled?

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  • Fuel pressure gauge non-liquid filled or liquid filled?

    I installed a liquid filled direct mount gauge to the regulator port. I was talking to a friend tonight and he told that the liquid filled pressure gauges show lower pressure when they get warm,not that the pressure is really dropping it's just what the gauge shows it lower.
    Any of you ever notice this too?
    Maybe thats why I have lower pressure after the motor warms up?

    Do you guys use a non-liquid filled gauge as a direct mount or liquid filled. I know I should get a gauge that I can see from inside the car but for now this is all I can afford.
    M&M #1240
    Apr 2001
    Ron

  • #2
    Second part of my question,

    How and where did you guys mount an outside fuel pressure gauge too?

    I was looking at getting this one?

    http://store.summitracing.com/partde...5&autoview=sku
    M&M #1240
    Apr 2001
    Ron

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't use liquid filled fuel pressure guages for that reason. They are almost always near heat whether under the hood or mounted on the cowel in the sun.
      sigpic

      Alex Denysenko
      Co-Administrator

      NHRA/IHRA/NMCA member and licensed Superstock driver
      NHRA and IHRA SS/LA & SS/MA National Record Holder 99','00,'01,'02,'03,'04,'05 & '06
      First NHRA & IHRA 289 automatic Superstock Mustang in the TENS 06-99
      First SS/MA in the TENS 04-03
      5 time IHRA division 5 Superstock Champion
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      The Barry of BarrysGrrl

      Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
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      Comment


      • #4
        I got mine at Zoned out, it's just your basic guage, and it's in-line between the carb and pump.
        William

        Semper Fidelis

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Moneymaker View Post
          I don't use liquid filled fuel pressure guages for that reason. They are almost always near heat whether under the hood or mounted on the cowel in the sun.
          Funny how you only learn this stuff only after you buy it!
          Do you use any of the little direct mount gauges but only the dry kind?
          M&M #1240
          Apr 2001
          Ron

          Comment


          • #6
            Ron, I actually use two fuel pressure gauges.One is mounted on the line coming out of the cool can before the carb.The other is mounted on the cowl in front of the driver.This seems to be the most common location on most cars.

            By using two gauges I can monitor the unregulated pressure from the pump,a loss of pressure here would be a good indication of dirt in the line or a possible pump problem.The other gauge is plumbed into the fuel rail after the regulator and as close as possible to the inlet of the carb.The closer the take-off point is to the inlet, the more accurate the pressure readings will be.


            I think the smaller gauge in the engine compartment is liquid filled. The gauge I have on the cowl is an old Sun gauge I bought years ago. It is not liquid filled and works just fine.As far as I know the reason gauges are filled ,is to dampen any fluctuations in needle movement.Maybe you could try a non-filled gauge and compare the two.I could see the fluid in the gauge becomming thinner as it heats,but I don't know if that would effect the gauge reading.You need a gauge mounted where you can see it to monitor fuel pressure @ WOT through the traps at speed.You should see no less than 5 PSI.Hope this helps!

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's mine.
              Attached Files
              William

              Semper Fidelis

              Comment


              • #8
                I have an Autometer 2 5/8" liquid filled fuel pressure gauge on the cowl of my Fairmont. What I don`t like about the liquid filled gauges are the fact that they need to "breath". I had been getting some funny readings, thats when I found out about the vent situation. The liquid filled gauges have a screw with a O ring on the top. Supposedly the gauge needs to be vented periodically, especially when you change altitudes. Since my gauge is inside a cup, thats too much hassle, so what I did was to lossen the screw, and leave it loose. It can`t get lost as the gauge cup would contain the screw. On my Mustang, I use the non liquid filled fuel pressure gauge.
                1978 Fairmont 428CJ 4 speed 9.972@132.54.mph[/ 1.29 60 foot.
                1985 Mustang NHRA Stock eliminator 302 4 speed M/S 12.31@106.99 mph, with 331 bracket engine: 10.29@128.71 1.37 50 foot
                1959 Ford Meteor 2 dr sedan 332 FE auto (finally under construction witha 428CJ and 4 speed.)
                1974 F350 ramp truck 390 4 speed (gone buy not forgotten)
                2010 Ranger PU 2.3L 5 speed
                1999 F350 dually, V10 5 speed

                Comment


                • #9
                  I never had any luck with the standard gauges lasting. Seems most fuel pump pressure pulses to the point that it causes excessive wear on the gauge inners. The liquid filled seems to tame the meter down some, and last longer, but as stated, may not be as accurate as they heat up. Always some thing.
                  1993 Thunderbird
                  393 Stroker, Vortech YSi on E85
                  Lentech Strip Terminator
                  3.55 Detroit Locker
                  http://members.tccoa.com/392bird

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So if you have a liquid filled gauge and it reads less pressure after it gets hot, are you suppose to set the pressure right after you start the car up or wait until it get hot and the gauge is reading less pressure to set it.
                    1968 Mustang Coupe Bracket Car 398W

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jerry, I learned the hard way to set the pressure before the gauge warms up. I was lucky that I didn't start a fire!
                      I corrected the fuel pressure after the motor was warm and I drove it for a good 20mins. Once it cooled off again the pressure was at 11 psi. Fuel was shooting out of the vent tubes like a geyser!
                      M&M #1240
                      Apr 2001
                      Ron

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Fastymz View Post
                        Jerry, I learned the hard way to set the pressure before the gauge warms up. I was lucky that I didn't start a fire!
                        I corrected the fuel pressure after the motor was warm and I drove it for a good 20mins. Once it cooled off again the pressure was at 11 psi. Fuel was shooting out of the vent tubes like a geyser!
                        Sounds like something I would do !!!!!!!!!!!! :hammer:

                        Best insurance in the world is that little fire extinguisher.
                        Eddie "D"
                        '70 Sports Roof, 351 W, 13.1 @ 107: Maple Grove.
                        "The deadliest weapon in the world is a U.S. Marine and his rifle." Quote by General John J. Pershing U.S. Army.
                        M&M Member #339.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 70 Pony View Post
                          Sounds like something I would do !!!!!!!!!!!! :hammer:

                          What does that mean?


                          Best insurance in the world is that little fire extinguisher.
                          [

                          I have a small extinguisher mounted behind the passenger seat on the floor. I can reach from the drivers seat. I also have a large Halon extinguisher mounted to a garage wall close to where I work on my car. Another home extinguisher mounted by the door going into the house,and three more around the house. My wifes grandpa is a retired Fire Captain and Fire marshal.
                          I also soak a towel in a bucket of water and keep right next to the car. My grandpa in-law told me to put the soaked towel over carb if there is ever a carburetor fire it'll put it right out.
                          M&M #1240
                          Apr 2001
                          Ron

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mark Ugrich View Post
                            You need a gauge mounted where you can see it to monitor fuel pressure @ WOT through the traps at speed.You should see no less than 5 PSI.
                            You've got that right, Mark.

                            Ryan
                            Quality means doing it right when no one is looking. - Henry Ford

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              :banana:

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