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Crimp wire connectors

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  • #16
    sometimes it is hard to relate when I have real world experiance vs book smarts which professors have.
    I agree everything has to be properly sized for it to work correctly, like you said a 14 wire as a battery cable is no good lol.
    Brian

    _________________________________
    65 Mustang 293ci, AOD
    06 Cobalt

    BCP Custom on Facebook

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    • #17
      Maybe this is what I was thinking of.



      VOLTAGE DROP TEST

      A voltage drop test is the only effective way to find excessive resistance in high amperage circuits. It's a quick and easy test that doesn't require any disassembly and will quickly show you whether or not you've got a good connection or a bad one.

      To do a voltage drop test, you create a load in the circuit that's being tested. Then you use a digital volt meter (DVM) to measure the voltage drop across the live connection while it is under the load. Voltage always follows the path of least resistance, so if the circuit or connection being tested has too much resistance some of the voltage will flow through the DVM and create a voltage reading.




      If a connection is good, you should find little or no voltage drop and see less than 0.4 volts for most connections, and ideally less than 0.1 volts. But if you find more than a few tenths of a voltage drop across a connection, it indicates excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or repair

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      • #18
        I think the best splice to use is a solder splice. It's a clear heat shrink tube with a solder ring in the middle with a sealing compound on the ends. You just strip 1/4inch of the wire put them together with the solder ring cnetered on them and use a normal heat gun until the solder wets. They have a 125lb. pull out strength. I'm not sure how expensive they are, I've only used them at work on the helicopters. I wish I would have known about them when I built my car though.
        1968 Mustang Coupe
        1965 Mustang Coupe (My Brothers)
        http://www.cardomain.com/id/Dustangs
        http://mustangsandmore.com/memberpages/2BAD6568s.html

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        • #19
          No matter which way you go there is alway a better way to do it. Like I originally said, if everything is sized properly a mechanical crimp will work efficiently. Just think of every electric motor you have in your house, think of the current flow and voltage through each motor. Then take a look at the terminals on the end of the motor leads, everyone is crimped. Even the internal connections between the start and main windings are crimped. Remember that when your furnace fan or your air conditioner kicks on. Real world experience, BSME with 38 years in the electric motor manufacturing business.

          Mike Golliver-MCA Gold Card Judge Modifieds
          65 Kcode Coupe Retired MCA, Now a play car, 347, 4 speed,[email protected]
          66 Convertible, 3 dueces and a 5 speed on a 289
          01 GT Convertible
          05 F150 4X4 SuperCrew

          M&M #79 June 99

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