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  • new Army sidearm

    http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/12/...ew-pistol.html
    34 FORD coupe...Cleveland POWERED

    it`s nice to be important but it is more important to be nice.

  • #2
    I've read about it and I don't get it. It would be cool if you could change calibers easily but the conversion kit costs almost as much as the whole gun. I don't see what the appeal is with "modular", what is the advantage?
    Ron

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    • #3
      The test of time will be the final answer. With Sig Sauer’s reputation I expect a great gun. I dont see the huge advantage in its mod design either but eager to see how it is liked once in the field. I was in the Army during the transition from the 1911 to the M9 Beretta- heard a lot of nay sayers and I was one of them.

      30 some years later I think it was a good gun. So much so I own one.
      Mike Gasdick 69 Cougar XR-7 , 14:1 358W Canfield heads, CalTrac's / split mono's, "Mighty Mite" C4 w/trans-brake. 11.39..so far.
      1996 F-150 two wheel drive. 5.0 w/ E4OD.
      2002 F250 Superduty 4x4 with a spark plug spittin', manifold crackin' , fuse box burnin , 5.4 !

      Comment


      • #4
        I would guess that being "modular" would let (let's say) an Officer, transferring from an Infantry 'Line Unit', to a desk job, or an investigative unit like "CID" can change his SIG from full size to compact size, without going to an Army armory and switching sidearms, and keeping the handgun that he is familiar with and (hopefully) shoots well.
        I also believe that some Special Forces members use the .45 ACP in some missions.
        Possibly, caliber changes was an option the DOD wanted.

        Training LOTS of your personnel with a semi-auto handgun is difficult. Revolvers are so, so easy to use and train people. The 14 pound trigger pull on a double action revolver is the best safety on any handgun IMO. An under trained individual can keep HER finger on the trigger while holding an enemy prisoner, or going into any type structure searching for enemies, without fear of an accidental discharge ("AD").

        As we all know, with a single action (SA) pistol or Double Action/Single Action (DA/SA) pistol, after that first shot, that sidearm is "cocked" and ready to fire bullet #2, with just a light touch on the trigger.
        These 'striker fired' pistols like the Glock and this SIG are ALMOST revolver like, even though that trigger pull is at least 8 pounds lighter than a D.A. revolver. I remember when the Philly PD slowly started switching from S&W Model 10, 38 Spcl revolvers to 9mm Glocks. I'm not sure how many there were, but there were more than a few "accidental" discharges. My 5 Squad Sergeant when I was a Captain, had an "A.D." in the locker room one day. He was a very squared away guy, a U.S. Army veteran and was the sergeant I had put in charge of all my plain clothes and under cover cops.

        Below I pasted a quote from the ARTICLE. It sounds like the author of the article does not know much about firearms...

        From the article:

        In battle conditions, it is expected to give Soldiers more options. Once fired, the new sidearm makes it easy to quickly aim again accurately and shoot.
        Eddie "D"
        '70 Sports Roof, 351 W, 13.1 @ 107: Maple Grove.
        "The deadliest weapon in the world is a U.S. Marine and his rifle." Quote by General John J. Pershing U.S. Army.
        M&M Member #339.

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        • #5
          I would like hear if this has any negative effect on police forensics. I'll admit I'm pretty ignorant in the field of forensics. Why I make this point is the only part that is serialized is the internals, not the slide itself. You can easily identify the serial number from a window on the side of the weapon, but this is simply the internals that you're looking at, not the slide or barrel or ejection port.... maybe I'm off base? but would like to hear if this would cause any problems for police work.
          Ron

          Comment


          • #6
            Ron, I'm not a 'ballistician' and never worked in our 'Crime Lab'. So I'm not sure how to answer that question. I do know that the 'lands & grooves' of a firearm barrel and the marks they make on the projectile are what usually identify the firearm used in a crime where a projectile is recovered in good shape.
            I also THINK .... that the dent in the primer of a spent shell, as well as the marks during extraction and ejection of it are also identifiable to a ballistician.

            So I would GUESS, that if you killed someone with this new SIG in 9mm, changed the barrel and slide (the slide usually housing the ejector), as well as the 'bolt face' and changed calibers, or used a new 9mm barrel & slide, the projectiles from your homicide would NOT be identifiable and not traced back to the pistol used in the crime.

            I'm not sure if I'm correct, and I'm not sure I answered your question.
            Eddie "D"
            '70 Sports Roof, 351 W, 13.1 @ 107: Maple Grove.
            "The deadliest weapon in the world is a U.S. Marine and his rifle." Quote by General John J. Pershing U.S. Army.
            M&M Member #339.

            Comment


            • #7
              Bad guys grind off serial numbers regardless of where they are located. This in of istself is a crime. i dont see the design of this gun changing that area of law / concern. NIBRS, as Eddie spoke about, compares marks on the shell casing and possibly rounds that were recovered.

              Regardless of the “chassis” it was in, the NIBRS date should be the same or traceable.
              Last edited by Dragcat; 01-03-2018, 09:31 PM.
              Mike Gasdick 69 Cougar XR-7 , 14:1 358W Canfield heads, CalTrac's / split mono's, "Mighty Mite" C4 w/trans-brake. 11.39..so far.
              1996 F-150 two wheel drive. 5.0 w/ E4OD.
              2002 F250 Superduty 4x4 with a spark plug spittin', manifold crackin' , fuse box burnin , 5.4 !

              Comment


              • #8
                Over guessing or making judgement against a decison such as this in my experience is fruitless. Only time will tell. (Again, been there and was wrong in the Beretta 92 issue)

                Time also fixes issues, such as the reason the FBI went to a .40 cal S&w. Read the whole story from the Platt and Maddox shootout, and the history of the 40 Smith and Wesson.
                I like and support the 40 cal, but time and technology has made the argument inert really.

                I like and shoot a 40 well. In years past I have supported the caliber greatly........but now I think the 9mm is fine. Not so 20 some years ago.

                The 40 is tough for a new shooter to manage. An average cop or self defense person that isn’t that great of a shooter or new ( often both will be identical) will do better with a 9mm AND it is now equal in real world performance.
                Last edited by Dragcat; 01-03-2018, 09:32 PM.
                Mike Gasdick 69 Cougar XR-7 , 14:1 358W Canfield heads, CalTrac's / split mono's, "Mighty Mite" C4 w/trans-brake. 11.39..so far.
                1996 F-150 two wheel drive. 5.0 w/ E4OD.
                2002 F250 Superduty 4x4 with a spark plug spittin', manifold crackin' , fuse box burnin , 5.4 !

                Comment

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